California Society for Clinical Social Work

Upcoming events

    • 11/02/2017
    • 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM
    • Jewish Family Service, 8788 Balboa Ave., San Diego 92123
    Register

    CSCSW San Diego presents Suicide: Assessment, Risk Formulation, and Risk Mitigation

    Presenter: Renée L. Chmiel, Psy.D.

    Description: Many people experience depression at one point or another throughout life. Whether it’s caused by a significant loss, an environmental stressor, or mental illness, feelings of depression can become difficult for many people. Unfortunately for some, the depths of sadness can become so deep, that they consider suicide as an option to escape from their emotional pain.

    People all over the world are effected by suicide. Suicide represents a major public health issue with significant repercussions not just on the human level, but it has social and economic ramifications as well. Suicide is a topic that continues to be associated with a great deal of stigma. People, even in the mental health field, are reluctant to talk about it, both with their clients in clinical practice and also with family members, friends and others affected by it. While there has been significant change in how suicide is regarded, we still have a ways to go. This presentation is designed to provide an introduction to the topic of suicide, how a mental health clinician may go about assessing for suicide, and how to develop a safety plan to help mitigate the risk of suicide.

    CEUs: 1.5 CEU hours for LCSW’.s, MFT’, and LPC’s. Note: Registered Associate Clinical Social Workers -- as long as your supervisor approves participation, you can now use CEs toward LCSW hours

    COST: CSCSW Member: FREE | Non-member: $15 for CEUs | FREE for workshop only 

    The San Diego Chapter of CSCSW holds its meetings on the first Thursday of the month from September through June  from 5:30 to 7:30 at the Jewish Family Service building, 8788 Balboa Avenue in Kearny Mesa. Meetings begin with a half hour of mingling, networking, and community building, followed by our program. CEU programs meet the requirements for 1.5 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs, LPCCs, and LCSWs as specified by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences; CEUs are FREE to our members, $15 for non-members.

    District Main Point of Contact: Ros Goldstein | Email: goldsiegel@gmail.com

    • 11/17/2017
    • 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • Palo Alto Medical Foundation, 795 El Camino Real, Palo Alto
    Register

    Mid-Peninsula District Meeting

    Mid-Peninsula District Coordinators:

    PresenterKaren Hamilton, LMFT

    Program Description:  This program will teach how to establish and enforce family Internet and social media rules and use of devices. This program covers Internet and social media “Best Practices,” which have worked successfully for families of adolescents. The examples provided will give lessons about setting limits around adolescent technology time. The program is broken up into three parts about how to get children started on social media, maintenance rules, and implementation of restrictions when/if need be. Specific rules, boundaries, and structures will be outlined.

    Learning Goals:

    1. Understand of the intricacies of social media. 
    2. Learn the need to teach families the model of rules and structures.
    3. Provide platform to answer colleague questions
    About the Presenter:

    Karen Hamilton is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and holds a Master's Degree in counseling as well as a Bachelor's Degree in Psychology. Karen provides consultation to middle schools and high schools. She has written a parent handbook on "A Guide to Teens, Technology and Social Media." Dr. Stephanie Brown spoke to us on Technology Addiction last year and highly recommended Karen Hamilton's work around teen addiction and media.


    Workshop Logistics:
    The meeting room is on the third floor next to the cafe with free parking below the building. Take the Main Elevator. Meeting time is 12-2:00 PM with the first 15 minutes reserved for signing in and networking. The presentation starts at 12:15 PM following announcements. 1.5 CEUs will be offered for LCSWs - members earn credits at no cost. Credits for non-members is $15 per meeting.
    • 11/18/2017
    • 10:00 AM - 12:30 PM
    • 2045 S. Barrington Ave., LA, CA 90066
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    Greater LA District

    Presenter: Lynn Jacobs, Ph.D.

    Description: The issue of diversity in clinical practice is broader than learning about race, cultures and ethnicities other than one’s own. It involves understanding the centrality of whiteness and how it permeates all clinical work, regardless of the race and ethnicity of the practitioners. Whiteness is particularly problematic for clinicians, in that they are more confluent with white cultural practices. All clinicians can benefit from understanding white centrality and its workings on all of us. One useful concept for deconstructing the centrality of whiteness is, “social location.” This concept will be explained and explored.

    About the Presenter: Lynne Jacobs, Ph.D., lives in two psychotherapy worlds. She is co-founder of the Pacific Gestalt Institute and also a Training and Supervising analyst at the Institute of Contemporary Psychoanalysis in Los Angeles. She is co-author (with Rich Hycner), of The Healing Relationship in Gestalt Therapy: A Dialogic / Self Psychology Approach (1995). She and Hycner co-edited Relational Perspectives in Gestalt Therapy (2010). She has also written numerous articles for gestalt and for psychoanalytic publications. She has abiding interests in furthering our understanding of relational factors in the therapy process, and in understanding the centrality of Euro-ethnicity and its implications for clinical work.

    Learning objectives:

    1. Participants will be able to define and identify social location and its implications for inclusive clinical engagement. 
    2. Participants will be able to identify white-centeredness in their thinking and that of others.

    Location Information: 2045 S. Barrington Ave., LA, CA 90066 (ample metered street parking on Barrington Ave or Olympic Ave which has 4 hour meters.) On Barrington Ave between La Grange and Mississippi, one block north of Olympic and Ralph's

    CEUs: 2.0 hours

    CONTACT:

    Lauren Small | small.laurenc@gmail.com (Greater LA District Coordinator)

    Nadia Aquino | nadiaaquino89@gmail.com (Greater LA District Coordinator)

    • 01/20/2018
    • 10:00 AM - 12:30 PM
    • 2045 S. Barrington Ave., LA, CA 90066
    Register

    Greater LA District

    Presenter: Christina Emanuel, PsyD

    Description: Although clinical writers commonly theorize race, class, and gender, they have not theorized disability, with the disabled comprising a group of most “othered” others. In this presentation I will discuss how my work with autistic individuals unexpectedly led me to the disability studies literature and the disability rights movement. I will discuss the main themes in this literature, suggest reasons for the absence of these ideas in our clinical theory and practice, and offer a case that illustrates these themes. I will suggest what might be gained by adding a disability studies sensibility to our theory and clinical practice. As a contemporary psychoanalyst I will present from a point of view that emphasizes phenomenological experience.

    About the Presenter: Christina Emanuel is a psychotherapist and psychoanalyst practicing in Pasadena, focusing her practice on individuals with autism and other disabilities. She is a training and supervising analyst and faculty member at the Institute of Contemporary Psychoanalysis in Los Angeles, as well as an Associate Editor of the journal Psychoanalysis, Self and Context. Christina also lectures nationally and internationally on topics related to relational psychoanalysis, autism, and disability, and has published articles in Psychoanalytic Dialogues, Psychoanalytic Inquiry, and The International Journal of Psychoanalytic Self Psychology.

    Learning objectives:

    1. Identify the three main themes in the disability studies literature: ableism, the transition from a medical model to the social model of disability, and the idea that “normal” is a construction.
    2. Describe reasons that disability studies themes are missing from psychotherapeutic theory and clinical practice, including that ableism is hidden in our culture, that we rank disabilities below other categories of identity, and that we disavow our own status as temporarily able bodied.
    3. Apply insights from the disability studies literature to clinical work, appreciating how ableism both in the consulting room and in the culture affects those who have disabilities, including how we construct and are constructed by the disabled/non-disabled system of privilege.

    Location Information: 2045 S. Barrington Ave., LA, CA 90066 (ample metered street parking on Barrington Ave or Olympic Ave which has 4 hour meters.) -- On Barrington Ave between La Grange and Mississippi, one block north of Olympic and Ralph's

    CEUs: 2.0 hours

    CONTACT:

    Lauren Small | small.laurenc@gmail.com (Greater LA District Coordinator)

    Nadia Aquino | nadiaaquino89@gmail.com (Greater LA District Coordinator)

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